Dear Nate

You were even younger than me when it happened, so I’m sure you wouldn’t remember, but my brother wrecked in almost exactly the same place when he was still in high school. Rolled his truck, over and over again. By the time it stopped moving, it looked like a piñata. He walked away without a scratch. Now, a decade later, we both know how that curve in the road broke a different family’s hearts.

You were pretty much the only one in school I didn’t know, and people loved you so much, I’m sure I was the only one you didn’t know. But I still felt it when you left. Now, when people go outside, even breathing seems louder than it did when you were here. Because we’re all in a hush. Because people are slower with their words now, and their tempers. And their cars.

I hear they’ll be putting on a 5k to help your family. I’m not good at much, but that’s something I can do for you. I know that kind of pain is something you’re familiar with; even though we didn’t do it at the same time, everybody’s talking about how you ran track. So I know you know the struggle of fitting school into sports and putting up with Holzhauer and fundraisers and only eating carbs. I know you know the pit that forms in your stomach every time you lace up your spikes. Every day, I struggle with the people you struggled with. That’s as close as I can come to knowing you. That’s as close as I come to feeling you. When I grind my spikes into the rubber and set, just like I know you did.

I feel you when I pass those two tree trunks on my way home, like you must have done a thousand times, when they were still whole. When I groan at the speed limit on 301, like you probably did that day. But now I stick to it. Not for my sake, but for yours.

It’s sunny and 75 degrees out now, so unlike the blizzard that it seems like a lifetime ago. But that’s just Ohio. It’s impossible not to think of you when the roads are shiny and the plows outnumber the cars, but we all have to remind ourselves on a day like today that it’s only been a few weeks. But we’re reminded.

You’re on walls and windows, you’re on doors and bumpers. You’re on everyone’s bio; on every cafe’s tip jar. And you’re in everybody’s head. God, let you be home. Above us, keeping us safe. It would feel cozier if you were. Though I guess in a way, you’re here no matter what. You’re carved around the trunks of those two trees that bid all of us to slow down and buckle up. You gaze up from the tripod marks left in the pavement outside the school by news crews, telling us to be gracious with each other. Because you never know when the drive home is going to be farther than you thought.

 

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6 thoughts on “Dear Nate

  1. izzy516 says:

    I liked how descriptive this was
    I noticed how you still felt connected to Nate even though you didn’t know him personally.
    I wondered why you picked Nate for your letter
    I would suggest telling us just a little more about Nate
    Strong words phrases or literary devices ” Now when people go outside, even breathing seems louder than it did when you were here.”

  2. jadenzaleski says:

    I liked your whole topic and the way you delivered it to the reader.
    I would suggest a little more backstory.
    I noticed how everyone thought and cared about Nate at the school.
    I wondered what school this was at.
    Strong words or phrases “Because you never know when the drive home is going to be farther than you thought.”

  3. I liked everything about this story, one think I liked was how descriptive and detailed it was.
    I wondered when Nate was in his accident?
    I would suggest letting us know a little more about Nate and his story.
    I noticed you said he was the only person at the school you didn’t know.
    Strong words/phrases were “You’re on walls and windows, you’re on doors and bumpers, you’re on everyone’s bio; on every cafe’s tip jar. And you’re in everyone’s heads.”

  4. Really good story Phil!

  5. I liked – How you portrayed the emotions that come along when someone dies, even when you are not close to them.
    I noticed – How you mentioned your brother, it added to the story!
    I wondered – Why you had never met him?
    I would suggest – Going into detail of your brother’s accident and how that affected you.
    Strong words or phrases – “Because you never know when the drive home is going to be farther than you thought.”

    Really good, Phillip!

  6. I have had this phrase in my head ever since I read this a few days ago: “You’re carved around the trunks of those two trees.” Haunting. Beautiful. Your honest admission of being a mere acquaintance of Nate’s puts you on the outside, yet surprisingly, that increases the sense of loss experienced by the reader. You provide a unique connection to Nate, especially poignant when you refer to the moments before a race. And you never lose empathy for his family and friends, the whole community who is reeling at his death. My parting words to the graduate: Whatever else you become in life, you are a gifted writer. You bless people when you write. – Mrs. G

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