Trial for murder suspect reaches conclusion

-Phillip Miranda

April 11, 1781

Justine Moritz, 29, as of April 2nd, 1781. Moritz is condemned to die on April 13th for the murder of 7-year-old William Frankenstein.

A verdict has been reached for the perpetrator of a crime that has horrified residents of the pleasant and peaceful Swiss community of Geneva. Justine Moritz, 29, a maid in the Frankenstein household, has confessed to the murder of William J. Frankenstein, 7, who was found strangled to death, his windpipe crushed, in Plainpalais around four o’clock, eleven days ago on March 30th. William disappeared while on a walk with his aunt, cousin, father, and grandfather, none of whom knew of the boy’s fate until early the next morning. William is the youngest son of the syndic M. Frankenstein, a man of powerful political influence in Geneva.

Interestingly, the entire Frankenstein household remains convinced of Moritz’s innocence, but despite ardent protests by Victor and Elizabeth Frankenstein, William’s aunt and uncle, to waive the death penalty, the court remained steadfast in light of the solid evidence against Moritz, which was that a locket that belonged to William Frankenstein was found on Moritz’s person the day after the murder. Moritz claimed she could give no account for how the locket ended up in her pocket. Also, Justine Moritz’s extreme disorientation when confronted by the magistrate was interpreted as nervous guilt which stemmed from her murder of William. Moritz has been scheduled to die at the gallows two days from today, on April 13, 1781.

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3 thoughts on “Trial for murder suspect reaches conclusion

  1. rblumfeldt says:

    Great job Phillip! Everything seemed very vivid because of all the info you put into it!

  2. catiebeach says:

    Great job (as always) I love the description, “Who was found strangled to death, his windpipe crushed,” poor William, that must have hurt!

  3. “Going to the gallows…” – nice touch. I adore the mug shot too. 🙂 Reporting on the court decision was a creative, yet totally realistic choice. This is the kind of story we read every day. Well done!

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